Amazon ECS (EC2 Container Service) provides an excellent platform for deploying microservices as containers. However, there is a significant learning curve for developers to get their microservices deployed. mu is a full-stack DevOps on AWS tool that simplifies and orchestrates your software delivery lifecycle (environments, services, and pipelines). It is open source and available at http://getmu.io/. You can click the YouTube link below (we’ve also provided a transcript of this screencast in this post).

Let’s demonstrate using mu to deploy a Spring Boot application to ECS. So, we see here’s our micro service (and) we’ve already got our Docker file set up. We see that we’ve got our Gradle file so that we can compile the code and then we see the various classes necessary for the service; we’re using Liquibase for managing our database so that definition file is there; we’ve got some unit tests to find so when I will go ahead take a look at the Docker file and we see that it’s pretty straightforward: it builds from the Java image; all it does is takes the jar and adds it and then for the entry point, it just runs java -jar. So, we run mu init and that’s going to create two files for us: it’s going to create a mu.yml file which we see here and so we need to add some stuff to the file it generates – specifically, we want to specify Java 8 for the (AWS) CodeBuild image then we edit the buildspec file and tell it to use Gradle build for the build command. Buildspec is a standard code build  file for defining your project so if you see our two new files: buildspec.yml and mu.yml so we go ahead and commit those (and) push those up to our source repository in this case we’re using GitHub and then we run the command mu pipeline up and what that does is it creates a CloudFormation stack for managing our CodePipeline and our CodeBuild projects so it’s going to prompt us for the GitHub token this is the access token that you’ve defined inside GitHub so that CodePipeline can access your repository so we provide that token and then we see that it’s creating various things like IAM Roles for CodeBuild to do its business and (create) the actual CodeBuild project that’s going to be used there’s a quite a few different CodeBuild projects for building and testing and deploying so now we run the command mu service show and what that’s going to show us is that there is a pipeline now created we see it has started in the first step.

Let’s go ahead and open up (AWS CodePipeline) in the console and we see that, sure enough, (the Source stage of our pipeline) is running and then we see there’s a Build stage with the Artifact and Image actions in it – that’s where we compile and build our Docker image; there’s an acceptance stage and then a Production stage both of which do a deployment and then testing so jumping back over here to the command line we can run mu service show and we see that we are in the Source action currently running and that’s just going to take a minute before we now trigger the Artifact action of the Build stage and so that’s where we’re actually doing the compiling so the command we can run here (is) mu pipeline logs -f and we add the -f so that we follow the logs – what happens is all of the output from CodeBuild gets sent to CloudWatch Logs and so the mu pipeline logs command allows us to tail CloudWatch Logs and watch the activity in real time so we see that our Maven artifacts are being resolved for dependencies and then we see “build success”, so our artifact has been built and our unit tests have passed so it’s just going to take a second here for a CodeBuild to go ahead and upload the artifact and then trigger the pipeline to move to the next stage which is our Image (action) in the Image (action) what’s going to happen is it’s going to run Docker build against our artifact (and) create a Docker image; it’s then going to push that image up to ECR. It’s also going to create that ECS repository if it doesn’t exist yet through a CloudFormation stack so we go ahead and run mu pipeline logs and we could see the Image action running we see we’re pulling down the Docker base image that Java image and then there’s our docker build and now we’re pushing back up to ECR I’ll take just a minute to upload that new docker image with our Spring Boot application on and that’s completed successfully.

So now if we jump back over to mu service show just give it a second we should see that we will progress beyond the Build stage and into the Acceptance stage in the Acceptance Stage there will be two actions first a deploy action that’s going to use the image that was created and create a new ECS service for it and so that’s what we see going on here what you’ll notice in just a second right there what’s happening is first it’s making sure the environment is up-to-date so the ECS cluster and the auto scaling group for it and all the instances for ECS; it’s making sure that’s up to date; it’s also then updating any databases that are defined and then finally deploying the service and so we see here is there’s a CREATE_IN_PROGRESS –  the status of the deployment to the Dev environment is in progress so there’s a CloudFormation stack being deployed. I go ahead and run this command mu service logs just like there’s logs for the pipeline all the logs for your service are sent to CloudWatch Logs so here we’re watching the logs for our service starting up these are the Spring Boot output messages. If you used Spring Boot before it should look familiar but this is very helpful for troubleshooting an application being able to see if logs in real time.

So the deployment is complete – (based on) the logs we saw that it is up – so we’re going to go and look at the environment here. We do mu env list. We see the Dev environment and when we show it, we can see the EC2 instance associated with it and we also see the base URL for the ELB so I’m gonna go ahead and run a curl command against that – adding the bananas URI at the end of it and pipe that to jq just to make it look pretty and sure enough, there we see we get a successful response. So, our app has been deployed successfully and we see that we are in the Approval stage and it’s waiting for approvals so we’ve completed the Acceptance stage.

Let’s take a look at CloudFormation to just see what mu has created for us. So, we see there’s over just (CloudFormation) stacks over here. Remember everything that mu does is managed through CloudFormation there’s no other database or anything behind mu – it’s just native AWS resources so, for example, if we look at the VPC there for the in dev environment we see all the things you expect to see: routes, Network ACLs, subnets, there’s a NAT gateway defined, the VPC itself and then if we go to the cluster we see the Auto Scaling Groups for the ECS container instances, we see the load balancer – the application load balancer that’s defined for the environment, all the necessary security groups and then there’s some scaling policies to scale in or out on that auto scaling group based on how many tasks are currently running. This is the service –  the banana service has been deployed to the (dev environment), we see the IAM roles, Task Definition and whatnot for the service.

Now one thing we didn’t do previously was we didn’t do any testing so what you can do is you can go ahead and create this file called buildspec-test.yml and what will happen is anything that you define in this test YAML will be run as a test action after the deployments made if standard CodeBuild buildspec file so in this case we’re going to use a tool called Newman. Newman is a nodejs command-line tool for running postman collections. Postman is a tool that GitHub created for doing testing of restful APIs. So, our postman collections. so we’re configuring this to run Newman for our tests. We’ll have to make a change to mu.yml – we have to configure the acceptance environment to use a Node.js CodeBuild image so that’s what we’ve done there so with those two changes we should be able to run mu pipeline up that will update the CodeBuild project to use the nodejs image and then once our pipeline is up to date we’ll be able to commit our change which is that buildspec-test file and once we push that up the pipeline will start running again this time tests will actually run and we’ll get some assurance that the code is ready to go onto production. So to make that change, push it and then if we look at the service we’ll see that the source action has triggered and we’ll just let this run for a while. The whole pipeline is going to have to run but things like the artifact and image won’t really cause any change because we didn’t actually change the source code but those are go ahead and run anyway so we are now in being image stage we’re taking the new jar file and building a docker image from it pushing that up to ECR we’ve now hit the Deploy stage so the latest Docker image is being used for the ECS service.

Once that completes, we will run that mu pipeline logs again to watch the CodeBuild project doing the testing and here we go so we see the testing is running it’s going to run npm install to install our dependencies namely the Newman tool and then we see some results so i see status code 200 – that looks good. Under the fail column, I see a bunch of zeros which looks great and then I see build success so not only has our application been deployed to ECS but we’ve also been able to test it and and now those tests will be run as a part of every execution of the pipeline as part of every commit. Now the other thing that we’ll recognize here is this application that we built it’s managing our inventory of bananas but what it doesn’t have is a real database behind we’re just using the H2 database that is available with Java so let’s go ahead and make a change here let’s configure mu to actually have a real database so with mu that’s as easy is as defining a database you give it a name you could specify other things like a type and whatnot but will default with the Aurora RDS and then you’re going to want to pass some environment variables so we will pass the database connection information to our spring app since we’re using Spring data source it’s just a matter of finding these three environment variables and you’ll notice that the username password and the endpoint are not actually in the mu.yml file we don’t want those things in there what what will happen is mu will create those for us and then they will make them available As CloudFormation parameters that we can reference to the dollar-sign notation that CloudFormation offers. ok so now that we’ve got that change made, go and add our new file and commit the change and push it up which should trigger a new run of the pipeline and again we’ve got to go through all those earlier actions just to ultimately get to the deploy action where the RDS database will be created now again you can choose any RDS database type but we’re using Aurora by default.

Now one question is well how does the password get defined so the way this works is we use a service that AWS has called Parameter Store which manages secrets and when mu starts up it checks if there’s a password defined and if it’s not, it generates a random 16-character string, adds it to Parameter Store and then later on when it deploys the service it pulls it out of parameter store and passes it in as an environment variable. Those parameters are encrypted with KMS – a key management system so they are secure.

Ok, so looking at the logs now from the service these are our Spring Boot startup logs. What I’m expecting to see is that rather than seeing H2 as the dialect…there you go, we see MySQL is the dialect for the connection that tells me that Spring Boot detected our environment variables and Spring Boot recognized that we are in fact trying to talk to MySQL – let me go and highlight that here. So, this tells us that our application is in fact connecting to a MySQL database which is provided by RDS and wired up via mu. So, we can look at our service again and watch the pipeline run and we can get some confirmation that we need break anything because we have those tests as a part of our pipeline now so we’ll let this go and – our tests are running. Once that completes we will have a good good feeling that this change is ready to promote the production.

Well thanks for watching and check out https://getmu.io to learn more.

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